Employers


Find a Diversity Specialist in Your Area

Professionals working in the field of Supported Employment/Employment Inclusion recognize that employment service outcomes for people with disabilities require the engagement and participation of employers. We also recognize that although the foundation of our work is to assist people with disabilities to identify, pursue, acquire and maintain employment – employers must be equally served through this work and through our service commitment to them.

Service Providers can assist businesses with recruitment, onboarding and retention. We also play a role in building employer capacity around Diversity and Inclusion. CASE Service Provider Members are encouraged to reflect an understanding of the businesses they engage, responsiveness to their personnel management needs and a strong ‘customer service ethic.’

Community Partnerships – Considerations for Employers

  • The service provider,
  • Has references from other employers
  • Has a formalized program which provides a range of recruitment, onboarding and retention services
  • Has an established system for workplace ‘talent-matching’ and ensuring ‘talent-readiness’
  • Has documentation to verify this job target as an appropriate talent match (action/investment plan, etc.)
  • Has staff and resources to assist with orientation, training, mentorship / natural support development
  • Will support the employer to communicate expectations and address concerns if required

Return on Investment

What is the return on investment or benefits to employers for hiring people with disabilities? The following are some of the benefits as reported by employers.

Hiring people with disabilities:
  • contributes to a better rate of attendance, punctuality, employee morale, teamwork and safety in the workplace.
  • often leads to a reduction in staff turnover; people with disabilities have proven to be skilled and loyal employees.
  • shows that the company values diversity and is a tangible example of good corporate citizenship.
  • increases the purchasing power for individuals with a disability and their families.
  • reflects the demographics of your community, and enhances the community’s understanding of people with disabilities.
  • may free up resources to complete other tasks and increase productivity.
  • allows the person with a disability to be a role model to the staff and community and others with a disability.
  • may include free corporate marketing when your new employee talks about where they work.
  • may require accommodations for your new employee, but the change may make your company more robust, innovative and adaptive.

“We have found that companies that perform well in disability are highly responsive to their customers, and thus outperform peers in revenue growth.”
Rich Donovan
Founder of Fifth Quadrant Analytics

Mark Wafer, owner of seven Tim Horton stores and a Champion for Rotary at Work in Toronto has hired 86 people with disabilities in the past 16 years. He had this to say about one of his employees;

“I have watched Clint gain confidence and independence as well as become more mature and responsible during his 16 years with me at Tim Hortons. He deserves and appreciates the opportunity to work more than anyone I know.”

Disability Tax Credit | The disability tax credit (DTC) is a non-refundable tax credit that helps persons with disabilities or their supporting persons reduce the amount of income tax they may have to pay. For more information, go to http://www.cra.gc.ca/dtc.

2004 - 2015 Canadian Association for Supported Employment. All Rights Reserved.